Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Annual Congress and Expo on Biofuels and Bioenergy Dubai, UAE.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Jose Marques

IncBio, Portugal

Keynote: Palm oil extraction revolutionary technology
OMICS International Biofuels Conference 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jose Marques photo
Biography:

José Marques is CEO at IncBio. Following a course in Economics, in the Faculty of Economics in the University of Porto, and after working in two different sectors, he created Incbio in 2006. Focusing on sustainability, his work has been mostly on recycled feedstock. To achieve the best results, he concentrated IncBio’s work in new technologies, using solid catalyst, dry wash resins, and mainly Ultrasonic Reactors. He currently resides in Porto, Portugal.

Abstract:

Oil Extraction Efficiency is the % of oil extracted from the total oil available in the total mass, of any feedstock. In the soybean oil industry, efficiency is approximately 95%. In the rapeseed industry, efficiency is approximately 98,5%. In the palm oil industry, efficiency is close to 50%! It is, without a question, the industry with the worst Oil Extraction Efficiency of any oil industry, and it represents an unbelievable waste, which has taken a big toll on the environment. With the increase of demand of palm oil in the last decade, for many different industries, the industry has been focusing on plantations, cutting or burning tropical forests, to produce more palm oil. But efficiencies have only marginally increased. IncBio’s technology has been under development for more than 5 years, and it has been industrially implemented for 2 years. After the first year of learning from issues that were not expected, the plant has been running for a year with and OER (Oil Extraction Rate) above 25%, when the national average for Malaysia is 20,1%. This represents an Oil Extraction Efficiency of 62,5%, or an increase of 25% over the current technology. While there is still a lot of possibilities for growth, this represents a major step in an industry that is known for hurting the environment. This can actually increase palm oil production by 25%, maintaining the same plantations, without cutting or burning any more trees.

Keynote Forum

Amruta Kshemkalyani

Sustainability Tribe, UAE

Keynote: How bio-fuels & bio-energy can contribute to sustainable development of UAE

Time : 10:10-10:50

OMICS International Biofuels Conference 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Amruta Kshemkalyani photo
Biography:

AmrutaKshemkalyani is graduated with Bachelor of Mechanical engineering and is accredited professional of USGBC LEED green buildings & Abu Dhabi UPC’s Estidama rating system. She has worked as Sustainability Consultant & Project Manager on numerous sustainable development projects in UAE & Qatar over last 10 years. Since past 8 years she is raising sustainability & environment awareness in UAE by using her expertise through her website www.SustainabilityTribe.com. She has developed sustainability policies for few organizations, set up sustainability departments & is UAE’s top sustainability influencer/advocate. She also works as an Eco-educator & has started #ZeroWasteUAE campaign in 2017.

Abstract:

Average person in UAE generates 5.4kg of waste a day. Food waste in UAE is also significant high. Food waste increases even higher during holy month of Ramadan every year. Rate of waste recycling & composting of organic waste in UAE is so low that most of the waste gets dumped in landfills which add to more emissions. The statistics of waste generated in UAE will be presented which is sourced from Federal statistics authority of UAE. There is huge potential of bio-energy & bio-fuels in UAE, which is still untapped. During presentation current state of UAE’s bio-fuel & bio-energy will be discussed which will include government & private initiatives. Also market gaps in bio-fuel sector in UAE will be discussed to get the idea of future potential in the sector of bio-fuel & bio-energy.

OMICS International Biofuels Conference 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Muhammad Usman photo
Biography:

Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Government of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 35 years with senior level experience on research and development of integrated agricultural industries with regard to livestock and dairy development, poultry, aquaculture and apiculture, sustainable agricultural production system, fruits and vegetable, seed production, biofuels, biomass and bioenergy. Usman is basically an agricultural scientist with specialization of agricultural/ chemistry working as plant breeder with regard to the yield and quality of various agricultural crops, released several varieties, presented and published research papers on crops and renewable energy in the different conferences like Geneva. Usman established “Prominent Agro Based Industries SDN BHD” in Malaysia and “Foundation for Rural Development in Pakistan”, with primarily aims to work on integrated agricultural project for Rural Development through improvement in agriculture for rehabilitation of affected area.

Abstract:

The role of fuels, biofuels, renewable fuels, bioenergy, energy efficiency, clean technology and sustainability were studied on the production of agriculture, agricultural industry which create income, generate employment and subsequently reduced the poverty in the developing countries of the world particularly South Asia. Fuels are any materials that store potential energy in forms that can be practicably released and used for work or as heat energy. Biofuels can be broadly defined as solid, liquid, or gas fuel consisting of, or derived from biomass. Similarly, biomass can also be used directly for heating or power-known as biomass fuel.Renewable fuels are fuels produced from renewable resources. Examples include: biofuels. Biomass- is biological material derived from living, or recently living organisms which is biomass as a resource for making energy, it most often refers to plants or plant-based materials which is not used for food or feed and are specifically called lignocellulosic biomass. Energy efficiency means using less energy to provide the same level of energy. For example, a compact fluorescent bulb is more efficient than a traditional incandescent bulb as it uses much less electrical energy to produce the same amount of light. Sustainability could be defined as an ability or capacity of something to be maintained or sustain itself. If any activity is said to be sustainable, it should be able to continue for aver.  Keeping in view the importance of biofuels, bioenergy, energy efficiency and clean technology which create income, generate employment, economical growth social development and subsequently to improve the daily lives for reducing global poverty and hunger in the developing countries of the world particularly South Asia. It was further reported that fuels, biofuels and bioenergy is the most powerful tools for reducing poverty in the world.

  • Bioenergy
    Biodiesel
    Biorefineries
    Biogas
    Algae Biofuels
    Biohydrogen
Speaker
Biography:

John Posada, Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology. Dr. Posada obtained his PhD degree (cum laude) in (bio-)chemical process design (National University of Colombia, 2011) and worked as Senior Researcher on the “Design of sustainable biorefineries” (2011-2015, Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University, the Netherlands). He then joint TU Delft as Assistant Professor in the area of “Integral Sustainability for Biobased Economy”. His research interests cover, amongst others, techno-economic, environmental, social and integrated sustainability assessment for the biobased economy, with special focus on the integration of the three pillars of sustainability for biorefineries.

Abstract:

This study presents the interim results of a screening of multiple combinations of feedstocks, logistics, conversion technologies, processing conditions and regional aspects for a biojet fuel production chain in Brazil. Thus, the number of possible scenarios is narrowed down from more than 200 options to 3 relevant cases.

The analysis is divided into two stages: i) screening of conversion technologies and different scenarios according to feedstock availability, techno-economic and environmental indicators; and ii) the most promising scenarios from Part I are designed and simulated in order to introduce more details in the techno-economic evaluation, environmental analysis and social assessment.

For techno-economic evaluation, the overall biojet fuel yield and the minimum selling price are considered as selection criteria; while for the environmental analysis, the used comparative criteria are greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and primary energy use. In the case of the social assessment, the effects of the production chains on six main aspects are considered: employment, working conditions, labor rights, equity, education level, and GDP.

The interim results are separately discussed for each dimension of sustainability (i.e. techno-economic, environmental and social) by comparing the pros and cons of the most relevant production chains. Although the information/data generated is quite extensive, detailed, and consistent among  the production chains, the discussion on the ‘best’ option is deliberately left open for decision makers who can based their choices on the relative importance assigned to individual assessment criterion.

Speaker
Biography:

Kelly Dwyer is an Irish Research Council employment-based postgraduate working between the University of Limerick (UL) and Monaghan Biosciences Ltd. She is currently researching novel enzymes from fungal sources which have potential advantages (thermo-activity, thermo-stability etc.) over current commercial enzymes used in various industries (biofuel, mushroom-growing industry, paper and pulp industry, baking industry, animal feed industry etc.). Kelly completed her B.Sc. in Industrial Biochemistry at UL in 2014. Kelly has held the following roles: QC Technician at Vistakon Ireland, Process Engineers Group member at Bristol Myer-Squibb, Tutor at Science Learning Centre, Laboratory Demonstrator and Graduate Teaching Assistant at UL.

Abstract:

The DNA sequences of two beta-1,4-xylanase enzymes (xyn1 and xyn12) from a filamentous fungus known to produce lignocellulosic enzymes with temperature optima approaching or exceeding 65°C, have been have been isolated. Both sequences encode GH10 catalytic regions, with Xyn12 containing a linker and CBM1 region at the protein’s C-terminus. The enzymes have been recombinantly expressed in P. pastoris X-33, purified via IMAC purification and characterized. The xylanases display optimum pH values of 4.5 and optimum temperature values of 70ºC and 75°C, indicating potential advantage over current commercial enzymes in industries such as production of biofuels, paper and pulp industry, baking industry, and the animal feed industry. However, when incubated under lignocellulosic hydrolysis conditions, both enzymes loose over 50% of their relative activity after 1 hour of incubation. With the aim of increasing the enzymes’ thermo-stability, and to further understand the role of the individual enzymes in a cellulosic enzyme cocktail, the enzymes have undergone protein engineering. The CBM1 and linker region of Xyn12 has been removed to yield a protein of 344 amino acids consisting of a GH10 catalytic domain. The linker and CBM1 region has been added to the C-terminus of the Xyn1 sequence, yielding a 408 amino acid sequence containing a GH10 region, a linker region and a CBM1 region.  The addition or removal of CBM domains in lignocellulosic enzymes have been previously seen to affect their stability and activity. The engineered xylanases are undergoing recombinant expression, purification, characterization, and are being compared to their wildtype counterparts.

Babar Ahmed

Mayor Shikarpur, Pakistan

Title: Renewing renewable energy
Speaker
Biography:

Babar Ahmed has completed his Bsc at the age of 23 years from SALU  University and CPD studies from BPP University School of Law London. He is the MAYOR of SHIKARPUR a Local goverment elected  representative with an ambition to produce renewable energy there inn.

Abstract:

Greenhouse gases. Pollution. The environment. All these are areas are affected and must be considered when producing energy for everyday needs. Coal, oil, and natural gas, all common sources of energy, are non-renewable. Once a deposit or source of these is depleted it cannot be readily replenished. A completely new source must be sought out in its place. These fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas are classified as non-renewable, so defined as they cannot be replaced easily. While renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power do cost more money than traditional energy produced by fossil fuels, they do have a much greener effect on the environment as they emit little to no greenhouse gases and are continually replenished. Fossil fuels are fossils formed over millions of years, while these alternative sources are produced every day by means such as wind and the sun. These renewable energy sources are viable due to the many benefits which ultimately will be directy proportional to food verses fuel What i believe as a Mayor attending information on international conferences can make me achive things beeter fro my city and ultimately playing my part for a world GO GREEEEEN!!!